Success Marketing and Portfolio Management

by Jan 29, 2020

Technology service programs are evolving to offer new value and benefits such as use and adoption assistance and resources to help attain successful outcomes. As technology service programs change service marketing must evolve beyond selling the initial service engagement and focus on sustaining and growing relationship value.

Success Marketing and Portfolio Management

Technology service programs and offerings must evolve, and companies need to look beyond service marketing to focus on Success Marketing and Portfolio Management.

Success Marketing and Portfolio Management consists of the practices and activities necessary to create end-to-end, integrated success-focused programs capable of delivering a value-based message to promote adoption and attainment of tangible customer outcomes that sustain customer relationships and promote opportunities for growth.

The Subscription Impact on Service Programs

The very definition of technology service offerings is evolving.  Service entitlements that were once included as foundational elements of a service program may now be included as part of a product or subscription purchase. 

Standalone service programs delivered by siloed services departments such as Professional Services, Training and Support are increasingly offered through integrated success-focused service portfolios.  Success-focused service programs may complement or fully displace legacy service and support offerings. The nature of how customers purchase services is evolving too. Support programs attached to license sales and professionals service engagements sold as custom time and materials engagement are displaced by integrated a-la-carte success services that may be purchased as add-ons or obtained by service credits.

Success Marketing and Portfolio Management Defined

Success Marketing and Portfolio Management consists of the practices and activities necessary to create end-to-end, integrated success-focused programs capable of delivering a value-based message to promote adoption and attainment of tangible customer outcomes that sustain customer relationships and promote opportunities for growth.

There are eight fundamental success marketing practices.  Several of these practices extend the focus and scope of traditional service marketing responsibilities.  The expanded scope of Success Marketing must include the following:

 

Customer Segmentation Strategy

Ongoing Customer Needs Assessments

Service Program Design Methods

Portfolio Management

Value Quantification

Sales Enablement

Marketing Tools and Resource Development

Retention and Growth Planning

Featured: Success Marketing and Portfolio Management

The eight fundamental Success Marketing and Portfolio Management practices are defined and described within this report.

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