Beyond NPS: Eight Metrics for Support and Success

Beyond NPS: Eight Metrics for Support and Success

BLOG

Beyond NPS: Eight Metrics for Support and Success

High customer satisfaction and Net Promoter Scores as the desired outcome of Support and Customer Success interactions, while positive, is not enough because it does not connect service delivery excellence with tangible business outcomes.

Why NPS is Not Enough for Support and Success

Support and Success must be focused on the attainment of tangible business objectives. For the customer, this implies that Support or Success interactions must help the customer apply a product successfully. For the business, providing these services must contribute to retaining relationships with hopes of expanding their value. This is why organizations must look beyond NPS (Net Promoter Score) when measuring the impact of Support and Success on lifetime customer value.

Attainment of high Net Promoter Scores, while positive, is not enough to indicate that “promoters” will correlate to the positive outcomes the business expects. The measure of Support and Success must be tangible and focused on “end game” results such as:

  • Can the customer use the product?
  • Can customers achieve tangible business outcomes by using the product?
  • Did support or success services help the customer attain their goals?
  • How will the customers’ ability to achieve their desired outcomes influence their ongoing relationship?

Beyond NPS: The Right Metrics for Support and Success

What is the primary reason for offering Support and Success services?  In most cases these organizations are aligned to help customers adopt and apply products successfully. The rationale is if customer can use and apply products successfully, you will increase the likelihood that you can retain and expand these relationships.  A single, simple measure such as NPS cannot provide sufficient insight to indicate that Support and Success efforts are resulting in tangible business benefit.

Consider the following eight metrics for determining the impact of your post sales services.

Metric

Description

1. Onboard

The percent on that new customers have received formal onboarding guidance.

2. Adoption

The rate that customers have met adoption milestones.

3. Success

The percent of customer that have reached established performance goals or milestones on defined journey map.

4. Availability

The rate that customers business operations have not be interrupted due to downtime or outages.

5. Engagement Quality

The percent of all customer engagements that result in positive outcomes.

6. Retention

The percent of active customers that have committed to renew an existing relationship.

7. Health

The relative health of a customer relationship based on the composite rates of adoption, success, retention, and recurring revenue rates.

8. Net Recurring Revenue

The net growth or contraction of the total recurring revenue relationship value. See How to Measure Net Recurring Revenue

How to Measure Net Recurring Revenue

How to Measure Net Recurring Revenue

BLOG

How to Measure Net Recurring Revenue

Net Recurring Revenue is a comprehensive indicator that reveals the extent to which you are retaining, expanding, and growing customer relationship value.  Examining the specific underlying elements that contribute to the calculation of Net Recurring Revenue provides necessary insights to identify the root causes of churn, attrition, and contraction.

Net Recurring Revenue Defined

Net Recurring Revenue measures the additions and losses to recurring revenue over a specified period. Net Recurring Revenue Rate indicates if the overall value of customer relationships is expanding or contracting. Knowing how to measure Net Recurring Revenue, you can obtain a clear indication of the performance and impact of service offers, products, programs, and customer-focused policies and practices.

How to Measure Net Recurring Revenue

To calculate the Net Recurring Revenue Rate, you need to know how much recurring revenue is added and lost within a period.  While you can calculate Net Recurring Revenue Rate by knowing the aggregate recurring revenue you add and lose within a period, it is ideal to have as much granularity as possible.

Recurring Revenue Measurement Period

Net Recurring Revenue is a time-based measurement.  Choose a period such as a month, quarter, or year.  The shorter the period the more likely you are to see variations from period to period due to time-based market factors and customer behaviors.  Measurement over longer periods will provide a more accurate reflection of the actual trajectory of recurring revenue performance.

Existing Recurring Revenue

Start with your Existing Recurring Revenue (Existing RR) at the start of a period.  This includes any sources of revenue that are renewable at the end of a term including product and service subscriptions.  This does not include one-time purchases and license fees.

Recurring Revenue Lost

Subtract Recurring Revenue Lost (RR Lost) during that period.  This includes subscriptions that are canceled or non-renewed (lost) and subscriptions that are reduced in total value (contraction).

Recurring Revenue Added

Add Recurring Revenue Added (RR Added).   This will include any new sources of recurring (additions) or expansion of the value of existing recurring revenue relationships.

See the formula below.

The Meaning of Net Recurring Revenue

Measuring Net Recurring Revenue provides a clear indication about the extent to which recurring revenue is growing or declining.  The more important insights from this metric come by examining the reasons for growth or contraction of Recurring Revenue.  Consider the following when examining Net Recurring Revenue:

  • What is the trend in Net Recurring Revenue – growth or contraction?
  • What is the rate of rate of change in growth / contraction?
  • What are the primary reasons for loss of recurring revenue – loss of customers or contraction or exiting of relationships?
  • What are the primary factors that contribute to revenue gains – new relationships or expansion of existing relationships?

The type and magnitude of changes to Net Recurring Revenue Rate can provide important insights into the reasons for changes to the value of customer relationships.  Use these insights to develop strategies to stem customer churn and reduction of contract value. Build upon practices and circumstances that lead to new customer engagement and growth of existing relationships.

Net Recurring Revenue

Recent Posts

Maximizing the Return on Your Support Knowledge Base

The Support organization encompasses extensive experience and expertise about how to use and apply products. Access to this Support knowledge is the primary reason customers contact Support. This article explains how companies can maximize the return on the creation and distribution of Support knowledge.

Eight Strategies for Keeping in Touch with Customers

Healthy customer relationships require an ongoing dialogue through digital media, self-help, communities and direct interaction with Support and Customer Success team members. This article introduces eight customer interaction best practices to engage and retain your customers.

Beyond Self-Service Deflection

The use of Self-Service deflection as a basis to justify investments in Self-Service fosters an expectation that it is only capable of reducing costs. This article explains why Self-Service is vital to a successful service strategy and delivers benefits well-beyond cost reduction.

Pin It on Pinterest