Optimizing First Contact Resolution (FCR)

Optimal FCR rates are reached at the point where it no longer makes sense to attempt to mitigate factors that inhibit resolving cases at first contact.

Optimizing FCR

There is a point when a contact center has achieved its highest attainable level of resolving cases at first contact.  The attainment of this level of FCR does not imply that the contact center has reached some specified FCR rate, only that it has reach a point where it is no longer economical to invest any more time or effort into mitigating inhibitors to increase the FCR rate. Consider the following steps for optimizing FCR performance:

Step 1: Optimization Opportunity

The first step in FCR optimization is to verify if an opportunity exists. The opportunity to optimize FCR comes from the ability to mitigate the factors that inhibit FCR performance. If the you determine through a thorough FCR analysis that nothing more can be done to resolve cases at first contact, then the optimal FCR performance level has been reached. 

Step 2: Root Cause Analysis

Determine what factors may inhibit FCR performance.  Attempt to establish the extent to which specific factors contribute to the reduction in FCR.  For example:

20% of cases escalated by team x could be closed on first contact if they had additional training about how to configure our products for virtual environments.

Step 3: Cost – Benefit Analysis

When there is room to improve FCR performance and the root cause(s) are understood it is essential to determine if FCR optimization is cost effective.  While there may be an FCR performance gap, the benefits to close this gap may not be worth the cost to close it.  In the example provided above the cost to develop and deliver the additional training module must be less than the expected benefits from resolving an additional 20% of cases at first contact. Resolving an additional 20% of cases at first contact is significant for 1,000 cases per month, but for lower cases volumes (e.g. 100 cases / month) the benefits may not outweigh the costs.

Step 4: Action Plan and Execution

Develop an action plan complete with the FCR inhibitor(s) you are targeting, the steps to mitigate inhibitors, the expected impact on FCR performance and the cost-benefit justification.  Continue to track FCR performance to assure that optimization efforts are working.

Want to learn more?  Download the First Contact Resolution Playbook.

Support Metrics, Benchmarks and Reporting

Support performance measurement is challenging. Contact me to learn how ServiceXRG can help you gain better insights into Support performance through the use of enhanced metrics, benchmarking and better support performance reporting.

  • Are you measuring the right support metrics?
  • Do you have access to necessary inputs and insights?
  • How well is your Support organization performing?
  • Can you generate the reports you need?

Contact us now to learn how we can help you gain greater insights and optimize Support performance.

Chat with us (see link on right side of screen), send an e-mail to tsweeny@servicexrg.com, or use our contact form.

Featured: First Contact Resolution

The First Contact Resolution playbook provides a step-by-step guide for defining and implementing a First Contact Resolution (FCR) metric.   The playbook defines a consistent and effective process to measure how efficiently each customer question gets to the person that has the skills, knowledge and tools to provide the right answer the first time the customer engages with Support.  The playbook offers practical guidance about how to measure and optimize FCR performance to improve customer satisfaction, NPS and increase overall support efficiency and effectiveness.

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If you don’t have an account, create a free* membership.

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*Membership level determines your access to ServiceXRG research and other member services. Paid memberships include access to research and playbooks. Free memberships include access to some reports and discounts to others. Please visit our membership page for a list of available membership programs.

Related Articles

Optimizing First Contact Resolution (FCR)

There is a point when a contact center has achieved its highest attainable level of resolving cases at first contact. The attainment of this level of FCR does not imply that the contact center has reached some specified FCR rate, only that it has reach a point where it is no longer economical to invest any more time or effort into mitigating inhibitors to increase the FCR rate. This article introduces a method for determining your optimal FCR performance levels.

read more

Social Media – Implications and Opportunities for Service and Support

Social media has captured the attention of businesses of every kind, as well as individual lines of business. Where else can a company quickly locate current and prospective customers expressing their needs, interests, and opinions? It’s no longer a matter of preference whether you leverage social media. It’s time to embrace it, even if it is just to monitor what your customers are saying. But where to start?

read more

Top 10 Practices to Achieve Support Excellence

Technical Support Excellence is the achievement of the maximum positive impact on profitability and reputation of the company, product or brand being supported through the efficient and effective delivery of support. Consider the following 10 practices in your pursuit of technical support excellence.

read more

How Productive is Your Support Organization?

How efficient and effective is your support organization? Do you measure how efficiently staff are handling core support activities? Do you meet or exceed industry performance benchmarks? The process of delivering support is labor intensive and costly. It is imperative that you establish and measure support productivity. Learn How.

read more

Top 10 Practices For Measuring First Contact Resolution

First Contact Resolution (FCR) measures the percent of assisted support cases that are resolved as a result of the initial interaction with a qualified support representative. Resolving cases at first contact will positively impact customer satisfaction and Net Promoter Scores. More importantly a well-defined method for measuring FCR assures that the insights gained from FCR performance will point to meaningful corrective actions to improve support efficiency and effectiveness.
This article introduces The TOP 10 PRACTICES FOR MEASURING FIRST CONTACT RESOLUTION.

read more

Six Steps for Developing a Social Media Strategy for Support

Developing a social media strategy for Support does not mean that the organization will have to commit significant resources. Social media strategies can begin with a very passive approach, such as monitoring communities and learning from customer discussions. The key is to develop a strategy that makes sense based on well-defined business goals and realistic resource constraints. It’s better to start small than not start at all.

read more

Social Media – Implications and Opportunities for Service and Support

Social media has captured the attention of businesses of every kind, as well as individual lines of business. Where else can a company quickly locate current and prospective customers expressing their needs, interests, and opinions? It’s no longer a matter of preference whether you leverage social media. It’s time to embrace it, even if it is just to monitor what your customers are saying. But where to start?

What is Social Media?

Generally defined, social media is the “intelligent organization of social discourse.” It’s become a catch-all term whose meaning differs depending on the user’s perspective. A student may view social media to meet new people, interact with friends, and get up-to-the-minute updates about gatherings. A hobbyist may view social media to share their enthusiasm about their activities with like-minded individuals around the globe, while a marketing executive may view social media as a goldmine of customer information and perspectives about their company’s products and brands.

For service and support organizations, social media offers a platform to gain insights about the issues, questions, and perceptions customers have related to the products and services they use.

A Unique Market Phenomenon

Despite the numerous ways it’s used and perceived, there’s no question that social media has introduced a market phenomenon unlike any previously seen thanks to characteristics that differ broadly from previous forms of communication:

  • Social media has created a channel that lets anyone interact and influence the market.
  • There are thousands of communities dedicated to specific interests.
  • Anyone can create and or join a community or simply monitor the discussion as a spectator.
  • The social media market is highly dynamic, with new communities forming and others fading.
  • A community’s discussion topics and tone can influence the perceptions of members and spectators.
  • Social media allows anyone to create and share observations and opinions.
  • The source of useful content is shifting from traditional media providers and businesses to the users and consumers of products and services.

Social Media Implications for Support

The open discussion of product-related topics facilitated by social media communities can be an extremely valuable resource to businesses. Many discussion threads relate to how people use products and the issues they face. For this reason, Support is a great application for social media. Social media creates significant new opportunities to engage unknown and under-served customers with the potential to engage more customers than through traditional assisted and self-service channels.

Support organizations need to start proactively engaging in the conversations related to their products and services and not simply wait and react when customers to reach out to them. Companies that develop and execute effective social media strategies stand to gain:

  • New insights into customer needs and concerns.
  • Ability to reach unknown and under-served customers.
  • Opportunities to positively influence individual and market perceptions.

Featured: Social Media - Implications and Opportunities for Service and Support

Social media’s ability to empower consumers by giving them the voice to discuss their problems and perceptions publicly has dramatically shifted the business/customer relationship. Companies need a strategy to engage socially with customers. Service and support organizations should view social media as a platform to gain insights about the issues, questions, and perceptions customers have about their products.  If you don’t have a Social Media strategy for Support, it’s time. It’s better to start small than not start at all.  This perspective describes the reasons why business, and particularly service and Support organizations, must embrace a social media strategy.

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*Membership level determines your access to ServiceXRG research and other member services. Paid memberships include access to research and playbooks. Free memberships include access to some reports and discounts to others. Please visit our membership page for a list of available membership programs.

Related Articles

Social Media – Implications and Opportunities for Service and Support

Social media has captured the attention of businesses of every kind, as well as individual lines of business. Where else can a company quickly locate current and prospective customers expressing their needs, interests, and opinions? It’s no longer a matter of preference whether you leverage social media. It’s time to embrace it, even if it is just to monitor what your customers are saying. But where to start?

read more

Six Steps for Developing a Social Media Strategy for Support

Developing a social media strategy for Support does not mean that the organization will have to commit significant resources. Social media strategies can begin with a very passive approach, such as monitoring communities and learning from customer discussions. The key is to develop a strategy that makes sense based on well-defined business goals and realistic resource constraints. It’s better to start small than not start at all.

read more

The Benefits of Social Media for Support

Social media’s ability to empower consumers by giving them the voice to discuss their problems and perceptions publicly has dramatically shifted the business/customer relationship. Companies need a strategy to engage socially with customers. Service and support organizations should view social media as a platform to gain insights about the issues, questions, and perceptions customers have about their products. If you don’t have a Social Media strategy for Support, it’s time. It’s better to start small than not start at all.

read more

Top 11 Social Metrics for Support

Social media strategies introduce non-conventional opportunities to deliver Support. Instead of providing direct assisted services or self-help content, Support creates an environment for others within the community to provide the expertise to help other customers. As Support develops social channels it must consider how to measure the impact of these strategies relative to their pursuit of technical support excellence.

read more

Top 10 Social Practices for Support

Social media’s ability to empower consumers by giving them the voice to discuss their problems and perceptions publicly has dramatically shifted the business/customer relationship. Companies need a strategy to engage socially with customers. Service and support organizations should view social media as a platform to gain insights about the issues, questions, and perceptions customers have about their products. If you don’t have a Social Media strategy for Support, it’s time. It’s better to start small than not start at all.

read more

Where Customers Look for Support Information

More than two-thirds of customers indicate that they attempt to help themselves when they need technical assistance. A general web search (e.g. Google or Bing) is the most likely first action customers take when attempting to resolve technical support issues on their own. In general customers find good information and are reasonably satisfied with their results.  This ServiceXRG study examines the expectations and perceptions of 588 individuals that use self-help resources to resolve technical support issues.

read more

Top 10 Practices to Achieve Support Excellence

Technical Support Excellence is the achievement of the maximum positive impact on profitability and reputation of the company, product or brand being supported through the efficient and effective delivery of support.

Top 10 Support Excellence Practices

Consider the following 10 practices in your pursuit of technical support excellence.

1

Define the strategic role of Technical Support by defining measurable goals and objectives.

2

Establish the quantifiable connection between strategic support goals and the benefits from achieving them.

3

Align strategic goals with tangible performance indicators and measurable business outcomes.

4

Align management, team, and individual goals with strategic support goals.

5

Define the target performance levels for each key performance indicator.

6

Define current performance levels for each key performance indicator.

7

Identify inhibitors to the attainment of target goals and objectives for key performance indicators.

8

Develop a plan for mitigating inhibitors to optimal support performance.

9

Provide continuous reports on Support’s performance to key stakeholders.

10

Connect support performance levels to the attainment of business outcomes.

Featured: Technical Support Excellence

Technical Support Excellence is the achievement of the maximum positive impact on profitability and reputation of the company, product or brand being supported through the efficient and effective delivery of support. Technical Support Excellence does not require that every customer is delighted with every service transaction or that Support achieves a perfect Net Promoter or Customer Satisfaction score. This Perspective introduces the definition of Technical Support Excellence and outlines the steps to attain it.

Login to get your copy.

Login to Access the Full Report

If you don’t have an account, create a free* membership.

Login

*Membership level determines your access to ServiceXRG research and other member services. Paid memberships include access to research and playbooks. Free memberships include access to some reports and discounts to others. Please visit our membership page for a list of available membership programs.

Related Articles

Optimizing First Contact Resolution (FCR)

There is a point when a contact center has achieved its highest attainable level of resolving cases at first contact. The attainment of this level of FCR does not imply that the contact center has reached some specified FCR rate, only that it has reach a point where it is no longer economical to invest any more time or effort into mitigating inhibitors to increase the FCR rate. This article introduces a method for determining your optimal FCR performance levels.

read more

Social Media – Implications and Opportunities for Service and Support

Social media has captured the attention of businesses of every kind, as well as individual lines of business. Where else can a company quickly locate current and prospective customers expressing their needs, interests, and opinions? It’s no longer a matter of preference whether you leverage social media. It’s time to embrace it, even if it is just to monitor what your customers are saying. But where to start?

read more

Top 10 Practices to Achieve Support Excellence

Technical Support Excellence is the achievement of the maximum positive impact on profitability and reputation of the company, product or brand being supported through the efficient and effective delivery of support. Consider the following 10 practices in your pursuit of technical support excellence.

read more

Top 10 Practices For Measuring First Contact Resolution

First Contact Resolution (FCR) measures the percent of assisted support cases that are resolved as a result of the initial interaction with a qualified support representative. Resolving cases at first contact will positively impact customer satisfaction and Net Promoter Scores. More importantly a well-defined method for measuring FCR assures that the insights gained from FCR performance will point to meaningful corrective actions to improve support efficiency and effectiveness.
This article introduces The TOP 10 PRACTICES FOR MEASURING FIRST CONTACT RESOLUTION.

read more

Six Steps for Developing a Social Media Strategy for Support

Developing a social media strategy for Support does not mean that the organization will have to commit significant resources. Social media strategies can begin with a very passive approach, such as monitoring communities and learning from customer discussions. The key is to develop a strategy that makes sense based on well-defined business goals and realistic resource constraints. It’s better to start small than not start at all.

read more

Why Can’t You Close More Cases at First Contact?

What percent of cases can your Support team close at first contact? The industry average rate across all customer segments and product types is 53.7%. Some support groups close cases at higher rates while other groups close cases at first contact at far lower rates. The question every support team should be asking is “Can we close more cases at first contact? If not, why?”

This article introduces the top inhibitors to closing case at first contact.

read more

How Productive is Your Support Organization?

How efficient and effective is your support organization?  Do you measure how efficiently staff are handling core support activities?  Do you meet or exceed industry performance benchmarks?  The process of delivering support is labor intensive and costly.  It is imperative that you establish and measure support productivity.  Learn How.

Productivity

Productivity is defined as the rate of output per unit of input.  Productivity can measure the efficiency of an individual, machine, or collection of inputs used to create outputs.  In its broadest uses, productivity is used to measure the efficiency of entire systems – factories, business units, departments, supply chains and economies.  For productivity to have relevance as a measure of efficiency there must be a clear definition of the following elements:

  • Outputs – A definition of what is produced. A unit of output must be clearly defined in terms of both characteristics and quality.
  • Inputs – A clear definition of what is included in the production of a unit of output. A unit of input may include the effort of an individual (e.g. hours worked) or a combination of many elements (labor, capital, energy, raw materials, etc.).
  • Efficiency Baseline – Productivity as a measure of efficiency relies on a baseline expectation of what should be produced per unit of input. A baseline may be established through observation.
  • Timeframe – Productivity is bound by time. To compare productivity levels the same timeframe must be used (e.g. a day, week, year, etc.).

Support Productivity

Applying productivity measures to Support relies on the same principles as noted above and requires a clear definition of outputs and units of input.  When productivity is applied as a measure of efficiency, there must also be an expected baseline performance.  For Support, productivity is often narrowly focused on case resolution as the primary output.  Measuring case resolution productivity is critical to Support, as it is the largest single output and consumes the most resources, but case resolution productivity cannot be considered the same as overall Support Productivity.

Successful Support organizations should measure Case Resolution Productivity but must also be cognizant of a more holistic definition of productivity that includes outputs beyond the number of cases handled or resolved.  Support is capable of delivering outputs measured in terms of customers onboarded, customers satisfied, contracts renewed, revenue retained, recommendations generated, and revenue and profit earned.

Definitions for both Case Resolution Productivity and a more holistic view of Overall Support Productivity are offered below.

Case Resolution Productivity

Case Resolution Productivity measures the rate and efficiency of resolving customer issues.  The unit of output is ultimately defined as a closed case, however the effort to work on cases, even if not closed, may also be considered as an output.  The unit of input measures the level of effort expended by Support staff to work on and resolve cases.  Case Resolution Productivity may be measured for an individual, team, product line, or across the entire Support department.  Elements required for the successful evaluation of Case Resolution Productivity are described below.

Inputs

Input is the total effort that an individual or team expends on case resolution activities.  This does not include time allocated to non-case resolution tasks (e.g. training, projects, etc.)  Input may be used to measure the productivity to perform a discrete task (work on cases) or by the total effort to accomplish a specific outcome (e.g. close cases).  The successful measurement of Case Resolution Productivity demands a firm definition of the inputs required to produce the outputs, consider the following:

Effort (Individual)

Effort defines the total hours allocated to perform specific activities.  As an example, input will include the total number of hours per day that a Support engineer is assigned to handled support cases and may include activities such as entitlement verification, triage, troubleshooting, etc.

Total Effort to Close (Team)

Total Effort to Close may also be expressed as the total time and effort to achieve a specific outcome such as closing a case by many individuals and span multiple days.

Total Cost to Close

Input may be expressed in financial terms as the total costs to close a case.  Costs will include all salaries and overhead consisting of management, infrastructure, and facilities for the resources directly involved in the resolution of the case.

Outputs

The unit of output for Case Resolution Productivity is ultimately defined as a closed case, however the effort to work on cases, even if not closed, may also be considered as an output.  The successful measurement of Case Resolution Productivity demands a firm definition of output. Consider the following:

Cases Handled

Cases Handled is defined as the number of cases handled by individuals or teams during a measured timeframe.  The “handling” of a case indicates that time and effort has been expended working on a case, but does not imply that the case is resolved.

Cases Closed

Cases Closed is the number of cases closed during a specific timeframe.  Case closure productivity can focus on first contact resolution or resolution within any other timeframe such as the same day, within a 24-hour period, within a week, or longer.

Satisfied Cases Closed

Satisfied Cases Closed is defined more narrowly by counting only cases that are resolved to the satisfaction of the customer.  This requires the definition of a threshold to determine what method of satisfaction assessment and score yields a “satisfied closed case.”  Note that the inputs required to achieve this level of output can be significantly higher.  All time and effort required to satisfy the customer must be considered.

Even with extraordinary efforts, not all cases can be resolved to the satisfaction of customers.  Given that an acceptable output may not be attainable in all cases, the expenditure of inputs (time and effort to attempt to resolve a cases) must still be accounted for.  In situations where cases do not meet customer expectations, thus are not counted as Satisfied Cases Closed (output), productivity rates will be lower than if all closed cases, regardless of satisfaction, are counted as output.

Timeframe

Case resolution is a process that may take a few minutes or several days to achieve the desired output.  If the measured output is closed cases it is not ideal to measure productivity daily as case resolution may span many days.  If the measured output is focused on number of cases handled or cased closed upon first contact then it is possible to measure productivity for an individual daily. Longer timeframes provide a more realistic assessment of productivity as it can account for variations in workload and case types.

Productivity Metrics

Case Resolution Productivity Metrics provide insight into how much output is produced with available inputs.  As discussed in the previous section the measure of productivity demands a clear definition of outputs and inputs.  There are several ways to measure Support Productivity and will vary based on the inputs and outputs used.  This section introduces the following three Case Resolution Productivity Metrics:

  • Case Handling Productivity – The measure of how many cases can be handled (output) by an individual or team with a specific number of hours of effort (input).
  • First Contact Case Closure Productivity – The measure of how many cases are closed during the initial customer interaction (output) by an individual or team with a specific number of hours, effort, or cost (input).
  • Case Closure Productivity – The measure of how many cases are closed (output) by a team with a specific number of hours, effort, or cost (input) expended over multiple days.

Support Metrics, Benchmarks and Reporting

Support performance measurement is challenging. Contact me to learn how ServiceXRG can help you gain better insights into Support performance through the use of enhanced metrics, benchmarking and better support performance reporting.

  • Are you measuring the right support metrics?
  • Do you have access to necessary inputs and insights?
  • How well is your Support organization performing?
  • Can you generate the reports you need?

Contact us now to learn how we can help you gain greater insights and optimize Support performance.

Chat with us (see link on right side of screen), send an e-mail to tsweeny@servicexrg.com, or use our contact form.

Featured: Measuring Support Productivity

This report introduces the approach and metrics companies can use to define and measure the efficiency and productivity of support staff and resources.  Support productivity metrics include Case Handling Productivity, First Contact Case Closure Productivity, Case Closure Productivity.

Log-in to get your copy.

Login to Access the Full Report

If you don’t have an account, create a free* membership.

Login

*Membership level determines your access to ServiceXRG research and other member services. Paid memberships include access to research and playbooks. Free memberships include access to some reports and discounts to others. Please visit our membership page for a list of available membership programs.

Related Articles

Optimizing First Contact Resolution (FCR)

There is a point when a contact center has achieved its highest attainable level of resolving cases at first contact. The attainment of this level of FCR does not imply that the contact center has reached some specified FCR rate, only that it has reach a point where it is no longer economical to invest any more time or effort into mitigating inhibitors to increase the FCR rate. This article introduces a method for determining your optimal FCR performance levels.

read more

How Productive is Your Support Organization?

How efficient and effective is your support organization? Do you measure how efficiently staff are handling core support activities? Do you meet or exceed industry performance benchmarks? The process of delivering support is labor intensive and costly. It is imperative that you establish and measure support productivity. Learn How.

read more

Top 10 Practices For Measuring First Contact Resolution

First Contact Resolution (FCR) measures the percent of assisted support cases that are resolved as a result of the initial interaction with a qualified support representative. Resolving cases at first contact will positively impact customer satisfaction and Net Promoter Scores. More importantly a well-defined method for measuring FCR assures that the insights gained from FCR performance will point to meaningful corrective actions to improve support efficiency and effectiveness.
This article introduces The TOP 10 PRACTICES FOR MEASURING FIRST CONTACT RESOLUTION.

read more

Why Can’t You Close More Cases at First Contact?

What percent of cases can your Support team close at first contact? The industry average rate across all customer segments and product types is 53.7%. Some support groups close cases at higher rates while other groups close cases at first contact at far lower rates. The question every support team should be asking is “Can we close more cases at first contact? If not, why?”

This article introduces the top inhibitors to closing case at first contact.

read more

Beyond Service Metrics – Focus on What Really Matters

If you are an executive at an information technology company you have a lot to think about on a day to day basis, but there are 5 more things that you need to be aware of.
Your service organization is an incredible source of metrics and measurements that describe ongoing interactions with your customers. They can tell you about the top concerns of your customers, the challenges they face using your products and the features they want to see in the future.

Service interactions with customers offer a wealth of insights into how to sustain and grow customer relationship value and create opportunities to differentiate your products. Of all the metrics your service team tracks there are 5 important areas that you should key a close eye on.

read more

First Contact Resolution (FCR) Benchmarks

The industry average first contact resolution rate is 53.7%, an interesting yet meaningless number for determining what your FCR performance level should be. This article provides industry average FCR rates organized by common product characteristics including: The type of product; product complexity; type of customer supported, product price level; and the quality of the product as measured by defect rates. Leverage these benchmarks as a guideline to establish your optimal FCR performance level.

read more

How IBM Support Uses Watson

The Service Innovation Series highlights examples of innovative approaches companies take to achieve service excellence. In this Service Innovation profile, we feature IBM’s use of its own Watson technologies as a platform to deliver a new approach to service delivery – Cognitive Support.  Read on to learn how IBM uses Watson in technical support.

The Ongoing Pursuit of Service Innovation

For decades service organizations have sought to find tools and methods to reduce the burden and subsequent costs associated with assisted support delivery.  Service automation and self-help strategies have helped to offload some of the support burden from support staff.  These approaches however have limits with industry average self-help success and deflection rates in the mid 20% range.  There are clearly benefits to capture and share knowledge with customers, yet it is costly and time consuming to keep knowledge and self-help systems up-to-date with dynamic product lines and everchanging customer needs.

IBM Cognitive Support

IBM’s approach to Cognitive Support is subtle and elegant.  They have introduced an intelligence into the end-to-end support delivery process that can learn and evolve to “augment and scale human knowledge and expertise.”   IBM staff do not need to retool the system every time a new product is released; the system does not rely on a formal knowledge management process to create customer-consumable content; and customers do not need to choose between self-help and assisted support.  The Cognitive Support Platform is fully integrated into IBM’s existing support delivery process.  It is designed to assist when it can and when it cannot it learns for future situations.

IBM has several advantages for adopting a cognitive approach.  First, they own Watson, the foundation of their Cognitive Support Platform.  Second, they have immense scale in support delivery and even small incremental gains can result in significant benefits.   Early indications suggest that the Cognitive Support Platform will offer significant benefits to both IBM and customers.  Customers get access to quality support with faster time to resolution.  IBM gets more satisfied customers, significant cost efficiencies and the means to meet growing demand without breaking the bank.

Apply Smart People to Important Tasks

Perhaps the most profound benefit for both customers and IBM is the ability to reallocate human subject matter experts to high value service delivery activities – beyond the realm of break-fix.  The ability for IBM to focus more effort on helping customers apply and succeed with IBM technologies is a win for all.  For all these reasons ServiceXRG finds that IBM’s cognitive support efforts are innovative and will lead to service delivery excellence.

Are you an Innovator?

Through the Service Innovation Series, ServiceXRG highlights examples of innovative approaches to achieve service excellence. Companies featured within the Service Innovation Series are selected by ServiceXRG and do not influence the observations and perspectives presented.

Is your company a service innovator or do you know of other companies that are?  If you would like to be considered for a future Service Innovation Profile or know of a company that should be featured, please let us know.  Send an e-mail to Innovation@servicexrg.com with a brief description of your ideas.

Featured: Service Innovation Profile: IBM Cognitive Support

Through the Service Innovation Series, ServiceXRG highlights examples of innovative approaches to achieve service excellence. In this Service Innovation profile, we feature IBM’s use of its own Watson technologies as a platform to deliver a new approach to service delivery – Cognitive Support.

Log-in to get your copy.

Login to Access the Full Report

If you don’t have an account, create a free* membership.

Login

*Membership level determines your access to ServiceXRG research and other member services. Paid memberships include access to research and playbooks. Free memberships include access to some reports and discounts to others. Please visit our membership page for a list of available membership programs.

Related Articles

How IBM Support Uses Watson

The Service Innovation Series highlights examples of innovative approaches companies take to achieve service excellence. In this Service Innovation profile, we feature IBM’s use of its own Watson technologies as a platform to deliver a new approach to service delivery – Cognitive Support.
Read on to learn about IBM Cognitive Support.

read more

Salesforce Trailhead

Salesforce Trailhead is a self-paced, online learning platform provided for free to anyone. The platform offers learning on a growing portfolio of Salesforce topics, as well as a variety of other non-Salesforce-specific skills individuals need to be successful in today’s technology landscape. For some companies walking away from training revenue would be unthinkable. This is a bold customer-success focused strategy with benefits to Salesforce, Salesforce professionals and anyone that wants to develop technical and professional skills. Learn more about Salesforce Trailhead.

read more

Webinar AI – A Catalyst for Support Transformation

Robert Johnson, CEO of TeamSupport and Tom Sweeny, CEO of ServiceXRG discuss the opportunities and implications of using AI in Support. This webinar explores some of the ways that AI will act as a catalyst to drive transformation of the support operating model. A link to the recorded webinar is provided below.

read more

AI – A Catalyst for Support Transformation

Support has been relentless in the pursuit of continuous improvement, yet the function of Support has remained fundamentally unchanged for decades. The logical evolution of Support is to focus more effort on developing and sustaining long term profitable customer relationships. Many Support organizations want to be more customer-success focused, but few have the capacity to change. To make this transition, Support resources need to focus on high value activities such as helping customers adopt and succeed with the products they purchase. AI is a critical catalyst to enable this inevitable Support transformation.

read more

How IBM Support Uses Watson

This Service Innovation profile highlights IBM’s use of its own Watson technologies as a platform to deliver a new approach to service delivery – Cognitive Support.
Through the Service Innovation Series, ServiceXRG highlights examples of innovative approaches to achieve service excellence.

read more

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